Oxford & Pitt Rivers

Class field trip numero 4!

This time we all piled on the bus and headed to the town of Oxford (where Oxford University is located).

Before heading to the Pitt-Rivers Museum, we were able to wander around.

 

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My FACE in front of the Bodleian library.  Any true Mary Russell fan knows one must try and visit.

 

I did attempt to sneak in.  The librarians are agile and attentive. I was unsuccessful. I’m not sure if Mary would be proud of the librarians or disappointed in me.

 

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University Church of St Mary the Virgin.  It’s really lovely

 

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The Bridge of Sighs. It’s a copy of the Venetian one. Still cool though!


 

Pitt Rivers Museum (aka the main event)

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So it’s all in this one big room!  All the collections are ordered typologically (basically by use) which is a more historic form of Museum organisation.

It works since the Pitt Rivers is one of the oldest Museums around. It’s pretty notable for letting the “common man” in.  To the point that the elites would complain about them letting the riff-raff in.

 

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Hence: weapons!  If you look closely you’ll see a cane that is also a gun.

The collection would be categorised as ethnographic- pertaining to world cultures.

 

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The displays have been updated over the years.  So it’s less about European supremecy and excellence and more about understanding our differences and similarities.

 

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Strawberry pin cushion!

Also, you’ll notice that the cases are nice and bright.  That’s super new!  In order not to damage the objects, old light bulbs couldn’t be used as they emit too much heat.  New ones don’t.

Back in the day people would walk around with flashlights (or TORCHES) as they say here to be able to see into the cases.

 

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There are so many different cases that fill the space! Kind of a history of display once again.

 

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This sweet Victoriana-Gothic cathedral is the Natural History Museum.  To get to the Pitt-Rivers you have to walk through here.


Rating: 4/5

Pros: cool, historic, easy to find and navigate, working with source communities to learn about objects

Cons: tight spaces, there isn’t a lot of room to display all the info (but the volunteers are super chatty and kind)

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